Bananachinese’s Weblog

April 29, 2011

Wen JiaBao’s China

Filed under: Citizenry, Government, Malaysia, Politics — Tags: , , , , , — bananachinese @ 2:17 pm

A news from one of China’s embassies in the world says:

On the afternoon of April 27, local time, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao arrived in Kuala Lumpur by special plane for an official visit to Malaysia. This visit is his first in six years.

In a written speech delivered at the airport, Wen said that Malaysia is a friendly neighbor of China and the two peoples share a time-honored traditional friendship. Since the establishment of diplomatic ties 37 years ago, bilateral ties have been developing rapidly with frequent high-level visits, close people-to-people exchanges and fruitful cooperation in all areas. He said as developing countries, China and Malaysia had a lot of common interests and that deepening bilateral strategic cooperation in the new situation was in the fundamental interest of both nations and peoples and was also helpful to the stability and prosperity of the region.

During the visit, Wen is expected to discuss with his Malaysian counterpart Najib on bilateral ties and other international and regional issues of common concern and engage broadly with friends from many fields in Malaysia. “I hope that this visit will promote the traditional friendship between the two countries, deepen reciprocal cooperation and elevate the strategic cooperation between China and Malaysia to a higher level,” Wen said.

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Want to know what does China stand for? First, we must learn some of its age old maxims.

“In learning, age and youth go for nothing: the best informed takes the precedence.”

What  it means:

The chief source of rank and consideration in China is certainly cultivated talent; and whatever may be the character of the learning on which it is exercised, this at least is a more legitimate as well as more beneficial object of respect, than the vulgar pretensions of wealth and fashion, or the accidental ones of mere birth.

Wealth alone, though it has of course some necessary influence, is looked upon with less respect, comparatively, than perhaps in any other country; and this because all distinction and rank arises almost entirely from educated talent. The choice of official persons, who form the real aristocracy of China, is guided, with a very few exceptions, by the possession of those qualities, and the country is therefore as ably ruled as it could be under the circumstances.

Oh, don’t forget this from the country acknowledged as a master in the art of government:

“To violate the law, is the same crime in the Emperor as in a subject.”

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