Bananachinese’s Weblog

September 19, 2011

Najib Razak, UMNO, BN, Pakatan Rakyat and the Internal Security Act

Filed under: Citizenry, Government, Malaysia, Parliament, Politics — Tags: , , , , , , — bananachinese @ 11:32 am

In a special televised address on eve of Malaysia Day on 15 September 2011, PM Najib Razak announced will abolish the Internal Security Act and amend a number of laws which have long been criticised as overt attempts to stifle democracy:

* Abolishment of Internal Security Act (ISA) 1960, which allows detention without trial.

* Three Emergency declarations to be lifted.

* Amendments to freedom of assembly laws, which will recognise Article 10 of the Federal Constitution but will be “strongly” against street demonstration.

* Annual renewal of publishing permits for newspapers will be replaced with a one-off licence, which can be withdrawn.

* Repeal of Banishment Act 1959 and revision of Restricted Residence Act 1933.

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Fine. Me have no problems with anybody making political promises in public. Freedom of expression, yes?

Now we await for the promise to be carried, to be made into law. Until then, no popping of the champagne bottles yet.

Me not being a grumpy sceptical, just being a citizen well aware of my constitutional rights.

Hope you be too.

June 18, 2011

Being MCA and the sunset of the Chinese cause

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Without the MCA spirit, what its leaders say and do are despised by its own grassroot and the venerable Chinese newspapers.

In the minds of the grassroot, the real MCA man/woman wouldn’t speak of imagined clash of Islam taking over race. Or to imply that Malaysian Chinese ceases to be a Chinese if he/she cannot speak in Mandarin.

MCA leaders have been unthinkingly caught in a bind of its own making that, being MCA was an absolute requirement to fight for a Chinese cause. The trick worked fine, way back in time before negotiating for 1957’s project Merdeka.

But now it is 2011, with courtesy of compulsory basic primary and some secondary schooling, Malaysians have got some education and been taught some academic thinking skills (I hope you have acquired them skills, if not all, some?).

Shall we ask again does the call “MCA fights for Chinese rights” sounds right today, in the dawning of Bangsa Malaysia?

In light of today’s reality, many wondered if there might possibly be a new lifeline lease to MCA, whether if it has leaders of resolute to rejuvenate MCA from the outdated agenda, that being MCA is not an absolute requirement to fight for a Chinese cause.

It is telling that nothing is done by leaders of MCA so far to give it a new lease of life through an updated constitution.

This jives with the groundswell truth that MCA has always been first and foremost to protect their own businesses and the economic returns.

It is a sunset era for MCA leadership of Chua Soi Lek, Ng Yen Yen, Kong Cho Ha, Chor Chee Heung, Liow Tiong Lai… (Go here to fill up with names and worthiness of MCA Central Committee members)

May 21, 2011

The MCA and JPA scholarship review and appeal yearly special

Filed under: Citizenry, Government, Malaysia, Politics, Repair — Tags: , , , , , , , , — bananachinese @ 2:21 am

You would think the MCA youths (overaged, paunches and all) would strategise a better way to show off their updated political skills in this changed political landscape.

Instead,

“MCA Youth secretary-general Datuk Chai Kim Sen said the opposition party was only good at “instigating problems” to curry favour with voters but had so far failed to propose solutions to the annual problem.

“If MCA Youth is a show, then the DAP is its greatest director and actor as well,” he said in a statement today.

Chai said MCA Youth was already busy reviewing scholarship appeals to help “victimised” top students…”

Duh… we all get nostalgic rewinds and replays year after year in the annual JPA scholarship appeals and review saga where students who scored too many A+ were:

1. taught how to fill out forms
2. submit to MCA
3. wait for MCA to review their appeal

Makes one wonder who elected MCA to collect personal data to review the students’ appeal cases.

Also one wonders why can’t the students themselves do the appeal rather than going through the MCA middleman. Like, duh, the students should know how to write and fill out forms and submit it by themselves, right?

Anyways, see extracts from other bystanders and try to figure out some thinking trend of these possible voters below:

You MCA dudes have been ‘handling’ this problem for the past decades without a solution, and you are asking DAP to come up with one? Crazy. (Chan Siang Yen)

What a stupid statement. In a Good government, reviews should NOT EVEN be needed! (EJ)

This PSD and scholarship hiccup is nothing new. It is an annual hiccup – a hiccup /laughing stock which MCA will never be able to overcome. What can the Chinese community hope from MCA? (LA Tan)

MCA, opposition’s role is not to shut up, but to watch and ensure you guys in the ruling party do your work. Busy reviewing? You should be making sure that those cases shouldn’t have happen in the first place. (Danny)

After so many years still fixing in progress? No wonder it is not relevant whether you guys are in cabinet or not? (amino suckers)

MCA has been using people’s emotion for publicity and for its own political mileage. (Gilbert Tan)

I for one am sick of this whole yearly wayang every year where our smartest kids think they deserve a scholarship (based totally on the unholistic evaluation of a single exam) while the government and opposition spar over whether they should get it or not and the rakyat like me fund this whole thing with our tax money without getting a tangible return! (Youdonotknow)

Above comments are extracts from readers comment in The Malaysian Insider article ‘Shut up and let us fix PSD problem, MCA tells DAP’

May 6, 2011

Guilty. Malaysia Members of Parliament

Was too angry to post anything last few days.

How can one not be angry when a good man was betrayed in death by the laws of the country and a man who caused his sufferings and eventual death was virtually let off with a slap on the wrist? Imagine his family’s feelings at being let down by law.

Read this.

Do you know, we cannot blame the courts or the judge, as they can only be guided by laws set by Parliament. We have to be aware the instrument to protect the country and its people is the Malaysia laws and in this case, the transport laws have not moved with the times!

How come important laws have not been updated before we were told by Najib Razak that we should dream to become a high income nation?

What have all our Member of Parliaments and NGOs been doing all these years? So busy with Barisan Nasional or Pakatan Rakyat partisanship that they neglected to fight to update laws to protect the real rakyat?

Don’t give me the excuse ‘because one is not the government, one cannot do anything’. It is now time to name and find out if any of our MPs has been faithfully ‘memperjuangkan’ laws be updated to protect the rakyat. Let’s see if we can make up even a minimum total of 10% from the 222 MPs in the house fulfiling their responsibility to push for laws updating.

MPs, you are the ones who should say sorry to the nation, you are part of the body responsible that made Malaysians lives cheap enough for hit and run perpetrators all these years.

This coming general election, we must question all election candidates thoroughly before we even consider to donate a vote to them – Ask them bluntly and demand for substantive reply on what will they do to push laws to be updated so that justice can be fair to the people, or a husband, a father, a grandfather like Ong Kim Koon. Rakyat should not be apologetically relegated to just a number in the statistics just because of archaic laws – MPs do you job or risk be replaced in next GE.

Still am very angry.

April 29, 2011

Wen JiaBao’s China

Filed under: Citizenry, Government, Malaysia, Politics — Tags: , , , , , — bananachinese @ 2:17 pm

A news from one of China’s embassies in the world says:

On the afternoon of April 27, local time, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao arrived in Kuala Lumpur by special plane for an official visit to Malaysia. This visit is his first in six years.

In a written speech delivered at the airport, Wen said that Malaysia is a friendly neighbor of China and the two peoples share a time-honored traditional friendship. Since the establishment of diplomatic ties 37 years ago, bilateral ties have been developing rapidly with frequent high-level visits, close people-to-people exchanges and fruitful cooperation in all areas. He said as developing countries, China and Malaysia had a lot of common interests and that deepening bilateral strategic cooperation in the new situation was in the fundamental interest of both nations and peoples and was also helpful to the stability and prosperity of the region.

During the visit, Wen is expected to discuss with his Malaysian counterpart Najib on bilateral ties and other international and regional issues of common concern and engage broadly with friends from many fields in Malaysia. “I hope that this visit will promote the traditional friendship between the two countries, deepen reciprocal cooperation and elevate the strategic cooperation between China and Malaysia to a higher level,” Wen said.

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Want to know what does China stand for? First, we must learn some of its age old maxims.

“In learning, age and youth go for nothing: the best informed takes the precedence.”

What  it means:

The chief source of rank and consideration in China is certainly cultivated talent; and whatever may be the character of the learning on which it is exercised, this at least is a more legitimate as well as more beneficial object of respect, than the vulgar pretensions of wealth and fashion, or the accidental ones of mere birth.

Wealth alone, though it has of course some necessary influence, is looked upon with less respect, comparatively, than perhaps in any other country; and this because all distinction and rank arises almost entirely from educated talent. The choice of official persons, who form the real aristocracy of China, is guided, with a very few exceptions, by the possession of those qualities, and the country is therefore as ably ruled as it could be under the circumstances.

Oh, don’t forget this from the country acknowledged as a master in the art of government:

“To violate the law, is the same crime in the Emperor as in a subject.”

April 27, 2011

BN’s headache: Chua Soi Lek and the MCA problem

Filed under: Citizenry, Government, Malaysia, Politics — Tags: , , , , , , , — bananachinese @ 7:17 pm

No need to write my 2 sens worth when Mr/Ms ‘election observer’ says it all:

“The real problem for MCA is that it lacks credible leaders.

The Chinese sees MCA leaders as self-serving [look at the party elections, the running down of its own leaders in MCA by different factions within the party and the inability to unite after party elections].

It is made worse by having CSL as president, a person whose morality is in question. The Chinese [the voting public not MCA members] do not hold him in high esteem and likewise the UMNO leaders and members in all likelihood. Hence, whatever CSL may say, only few will listen to him. Instead of advising other parties like SUPP not to join the Sarawak state cabinet.

It is time for CSL and his supporters to let new capable leaders who have no fear of losing cabinet positions and personal gains take over MCA, leaders who dare tell UMNO to treat them with dignity and fairness or else they are prepared to work outside Barisan [not just say it but mean it].

And don’t worry or pretend to worry that the Chinese will be worse off without MCA’s participation in the government. We have heard this talk before, believe me the Chinese will survive without MCA in the Barisan government.”

hmmmm… makes one wonder why the current batch of MCA leaders are so helplessly unworthy in their community’s eye.  Some said MCA’s leadership is obsolete and has expired a long time ago. If I were Chua Soi Lek and gang, I’d retreat and let the party have a real election for real leaders (for once).

Find the MCA leaders here

There are also 2 burning question from a friend: “Why the majority of the Chinese want to vote for opposition? Was it because MCA had betrayed them for the past 53 years?”

April 21, 2011

Will you ask Najib Razak to quit as PM if MCA fail in GE13?

Am very impressed with concerns raised by commentators reacting to Chua Soi Lek’s call to Taib Mahmud to step down cos the old guy’s SUPP couldn’t deliver the Chinese votes.

So, Najib? Want to slap MCA leaders/ministers (Chua Soi Lek, Liow Tiong Lai, Ng Yen Yen, Chor Chee Heung, Kong Chor Ha) or not for their insolence towards 1Malaysia new politics? Make sure you keep this in mind when you do the shuffle for the cabinet, ok?

Read and be entertained:

“Did MCA did better or worse than SUPP in 2008? Do they know that by implication, they will ask Najib to quit UMNO if MCA is wiped out (and MCA WILL be wiped out) in the next GE? Why are you adopting Mahathir, Perkasa and Pembela culture? Sad betrayal of Chinese hopes and trust.”

“There is only bn and mca who went around telling a particular race that they will not have such race in the government if not elected. This is a scare tactic but does not work cos what we want is those to rep us must be of integrity, caring and those corrupt, racialist and now blame others for their doing.Pui to you mca, mahatir, utusan and perkasa.”

“Be careful! Taib will very soon be asking MCA to extinct yourselves for losing Chinese support.”

“.. the political climate has changed and MCA is losing direction as how to function in this new environment. Telling others to quit when they themselves should dissappear”

“Just sorak kosong. Taib will add on MCA joker list to persona-non-grata to the state immigration department under circus clown without state permit.”

“Call for Taib to quit is ungentlemanly. PBB won 100 % and if PBB had taken a beating, Sarawak would most probably be run by Pakatan.”

“Why must MCA always argue their case based on racial lines? Whilst it’s fitting that they can clamour for the ouster of Taib, we ought to put the record straight that it was not only the Chinese who do not support the CM but the other races as well. It was quite coincidental that the majority of the urbanites are Chinese and this was perceived as the actual scenario.”

And this remark by ‘Confused’ says it all for the confused public:

“I just do not know what the MCA is up to making all sorts of statements. I do not support Taib and think he should resign BUT the fact is Sarawak BN won 55 out of 71 seats(77% of the seats) and PBB won all 35 seats it contested. If Taib should quit because he has lost the support of the Chinese community, should not Najib quit too because he has also lost the support of the Chinese community too and has a lower percentage of seats?”

April 13, 2011

So, how about a score for Sarawak?

I’m trying to vary the contents of me blog. Boring will it be if it solely be bananafied’s voice always (in Yoda language).

So, here’s another article from a friend in Sarawak to dedicate to BC’s dear readers. Any comments, you know what to do lar.

How About A Score For Sarawak?

There is one important question that a proud Sarawakian voter will question their election candidates before they pre-qualify them, especially to the novice politicians before letting them make long range policies on behalf of the people of the state.

We all know about those familiar faced candidates who have been involved in mapping out the Sarawak State Assembly policy for its economic and education future. From the Barisan Nasional’s side, they’re the ones who have been seen participating and contributed input into drawing up of crucial state developmental policies like education which achieved its goal of establishing 3 public universities, 3 private universities, 38 private colleges or university branch campuses. Another important developmental policy for the economic growth is outlined in SCORE (Sarawak Corridor Of Renewable Energy) that we keep reading about in the newspaper ever since BN highlighted it prominently in their manifesto.

Before we proceed, let’s arrive at a common understanding of what is a manifesto. According to Wikipedia, it is a public declaration of policy and aims, especially one issued before an election by a political party or candidate.

For this round of the Sarawak state election, the manifestos from both Barisan Nasional and Pakatan Rakyat are already disseminated to the voting public and hopefully will not escape the scrutinizing of the all voters who may or may not be partial to any contesting party.

Let’s check out BN’s manifesto which actually has a long range plan via Score to change Sarawak to become the richest State in Malaysia. According the elaboration, Score would increase the state’s per capita income to RM97,500 by 2030, compared with RM45,000 in 2020 and RM37,287 last year.

So, what’s in the Score that is relevant to the normal man who needs to make a living from day to day to feed his family? A further check with the manifesto (by the way, this is a good authority to reference now that it is a made as promise by BN) says that Score is capable of generating 836,000 jobs by 2030, including 44,000 at the professional and management levels as well as 82,000 engineering and technical jobs. Ok, increase of job opportunities checked for the future.

Next, which sector of the economy that BN tells me I should guide my children to specialise in their studies so that they can ride on the economic road map?

Vide Score, BN will give special emphasis to oil, aluminium, iron, glass, marine engineering and food processing in the halal hub. Ok, checked – areas of education for children to pursue in their studies, if they do so desire.

Additionally, BN promises to do the following which I don’t think anybody will pick a quarrel with:
• The protection of the environment,
• The preservation of the culture,
• Traditions of all the peoples in the state; generating more employment and business opportunities;
• Providing more education opportunities and guaranteeing the people’s rights over their lands.
• Improve quality of life, basic amenities and infrastructure eg: roads, water supply, electricity, health services and housing would be provided.

Well, so much for BN’s manifesto.

What does Pakatan Rakyat’s 10 point manifesto tell voters?

Basically, to give the state’s wealth to the people. guarantee of freedom of religion, free WiFi to move Sarawak into a knowledge-state, a Competency, Accountability and Transparency system of governance, respecting the 18-points agreement and a promise to investigate allegations of ill-gotten wealth of BN leaders and their cronies.

Kudos for display of nice ideals and admirable aspiration, realistically please give details of your long range plans to your intelligent voters? How about a policy plan to 2020 or beyond to prove Pakatan’s here to stay, Baru Bian? Do consider this important hallmark of a government before attempting to score for the Pakatan ship.

By: Bintang Bulan

April 10, 2011

Let a wise man makes his own decisions, an ignorant man follows public opinion

An excited friend admonished me:

“My dear BC, why are you keeping silent on the Sarawak state election? It is really exciting here in Kuching, the crowds here get to listen to really good talks by opposition every night, DAP speakers are good and entertaining, SUPP not as fiery, but seems like the new chap Dr. Sim Kui Hian is steady and looks like a very reliable politician – if he is elected lar…”

My friend… I’m still in holiday mood and will opt to not side any one party at the moment. So, Sarawakian friends will be missing out on my knify sharp political analysis this week, hehehe.

Anyways, to sooth friends who are buoyed by the highs courtesy of opposition speakers, share with you something I’ve gotten from another savvy friend.

Until next week,

Let a wise man makes his own decisions, an ignorant man follows public opinion

It is a common human fallacy to generalize issues when trying to justify one’s argument in order to KO the opponent. Who haven’t heard of someone who will say “He/she is so typical of a xxx (insert race/category of profession) therefore he/she is (insert assumption of undesirable action here).”

Let’s not be ashamed to admit it, most of us might have done it conscious or unconsciously. Even the DAP and other opposition parties tend to do this ‘natural’ thing. Usually, the members of the opposition will strike first with accusations of xxx (insert preferred presumptions of guilt before trial here). And then it is followed up by bombardments and arguments to stir up the public’s emotion with insinuated wrongdoings such as, “xxx is rich, therefore xxx is corrupted”. This is a well worn method as human beings are found to be intrigued by real or imagined scandals especially if it can blacken the image of the more famous member of the community.

But if one were to dig deeper, one will find that the argument was not wholesome and skewed to be lopsided towards the interest of the opposition. For instance, when debating issues of development, the attacker will not acknowledge truths of how the whole community has also benefited to rise up to better living as compared to their forefather’s hard environment which seriously lacked the economic public infrastructure built up since then. There was no recognition for work and effort put in by the state to satisfy and balance various communities’ demands, sensitivities and interpretations of social justice.

One is reminded how the Chinese who are generally well recognised for their belief in ‘Dao’ and that everything in the universe have a black and white perspective that balances each side for a harmonious life existence. Many Chinese sayings have been handed down since the ancient sage kings to disseminate their wisdom to guide the new generations to balance all sides of each story. Indeed, this has given rise to the general perception that all Chinese are pragmatic practitioners capable of understanding the Dao of both sides of the story before making hasty decisions.

Why not try out the Chinese way to analyze what has been given as ‘truth’ and avoid the risk falling into the trap of ‘One stick knocking down the whole village’. Don’t you think it is a great injustice to deny the work of many good people from the village who has silently contributed to make our lives better today?

by: Bintang Bulan

March 22, 2011

Update: Nobody watched ‘blue’ movie in Parliament

Filed under: Announcement, Citizenry, Government, Malaysia, Parliament — Tags: , , , — bananachinese @ 1:29 pm

Here’s an update on my previous post – Nazri Aziz has now come out to protect sanctity of Parliament.

Nobody watched ‘blue’ movie in Parliament: Nazri (read Malaysiakini here)

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