Bananachinese’s Weblog

January 9, 2013

About the rape in India

Filed under: Citizenry, Forum, Government, Life, Politics — Tags: , , , , , — bananachinese @ 1:52 pm

Rama Sita

I read an interesting article on The New York Times Op-Ed “The Unspeakable Truth About Rape In India” and found an interesting comment from a reader about India.

Read and tell me about your reaction to below commentator.

Comment from: Cleanup from U.S.

“Crime like rapes etc are the result of lawlessness and political corruption in India. It is clear now, protests marches do not work as they are easily crushed the same way India’s Anti corruption movement was crushed.

The main curse of India is this- the country has been ruled by old, uneducated, inefficient, corrupt politicians who consider themselves lords and masters since the British left.

The opposition is the same.

The Prime Minister is educated but is unable to think outside the box.

Every project, every deal allows the politicians to collect huge cuts and the citizens end up with lousy deals, crumbling roads and infrastructure. Scam after scams are revealed only to be hushed up. Giving and taking kickbacks have been perfected to an art form and no one gets caught.

The politicians , public servants and their relatives are some of the richest in the world. It’s time the world comes to know the truth and hopefully these politicians would feel some shame for what is happening to this land of a billion plus people.

India needs massive doses of new blood,-educated modern thinking to be injected into the government. Indians must encourage educated result oriented, people from the private sector to join politics. If not this cancer of corruption, lawlessness will destroy this country. India is now one of the the largest kleptocracies in the world.”

 

August 15, 2012

Super Boring CyberTeams

Filed under: Citizenry, Media, Politics — Tags: , , , — bananachinese @ 7:20 pm

Most Malaysian politicos think social media outreach is spamming the same boring slogan, sex expose or mindless pantun-like pitch to their own followers / bloggers.

Then some made it a social media SOP, asking for a link or re-tweets to cover more miles… (how to extend to fence sitters voters, la? When their readers are within their little circle only?)

Recently, launch of recruitment of naivete volunteers on le rebranded cyberteam was done. (pat, pats on the backs, congratulated each other)

Oi, how to sell la when your own ‘established’ cybertroopers oops, cyber team are incapable to produce convincing messages to get buy-in from people who might be able to be tempted to find out more?

Most cyber troopers think that social media is all about agitatement, “who best agitate others wins”. And, then get agitated themselves when being asked hard questions.

Duh, if you’re afraid of what people are going to say, then maybe you should focus on straightening yourselves out first.

Like, do get yourselves trained by a social media specialist, ok?

June 11, 2012

Philosophy of new voters registration

Filed under: Citizenry, Government, Malaysia, Parliament, Politics — Tags: , , , , , , , — bananachinese @ 3:21 pm

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Always, always you hear Barisan Nasional and Pakatan Rakyat harping on importance of new voters registration for their party to win the polls. Always, always we hear anecdotes by politicians that registering new voters will add more votes to their party..

Sure or not?

In this age of more heightened human and consumer rights, how can UMNO, MCA, MIC, PAS, DAP, PKR, etc., not realise that most people who aren’t already registered aren’t registered for a reason?

That big reason being they don’t WANT to be registered? That the major reason being they don’t TRUST the political parties to do the lawmaking job effectively?

Consequently, even if you get them to register, it’s going to be tough to get them to actually turn out to vote.

Ain’t that a lot of time and energy wasted for minimal potential return?

Amazing isn’t it, the unthinkingness of our politicians…

May 24, 2012

I love democracy, do you?

Filed under: Citizenry, Government, Malaysia, news, Politics — Tags: , , , , — bananachinese @ 7:23 pm

Many displays of democracy nowadays for Malaysians to learn.

How have you enjoyed the spirit and principles of democracy so far?

Here’re a simple issue for you to make into conversation or to reflect upon with your buddies. Or, if you can, throw this question to your current / aspirant Member of Parliament.

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Q: Is this Democracy at work?

“Two anti-Bersih groups have surrounded the vicinity of Bersih co-chairperson Ambiga Sreenevasan’s residence today…”

Source: http://malaysiakini.com/news/198937

vs

“BERSIH 3.0 will take the form of a sit-in (“duduk bantah” in Bahasa Malaysia) on April 28th 2012, and will take place across Malaysia and throughout the world….

Through BERSIH 3.0, we will continue our struggle for clean and fair elections, assembling and expressing our views peacefully as are our rights as enshrined in the Federal Constitution…”

Source: http://bersih.org/?p=4696

April 27, 2012

Who’s your social media manager cum listening specialist?

Filed under: Citizenry, Life, Malaysia, Media, Politics, Repair — Tags: , , , , , , — bananachinese @ 1:59 pm

Most, if not all businesses think community metrics equals revenue, ROI, brand equity.

But if you are only basing your success on retweets, influence scores and popularity then you are standing on shaky ground and bound to fall flat on your face.

If your business really want to make it in a social environment, you must

1. Be open to a mindset change

Do you have the guts to listen to what people are really saying about you and your business in the social world?

Any good social media manager or agency or consultant should have the guts and knowledge to provide you the real information, and help you set priorities and decisions for how to best embed social within the DNA of your business.

2. Get real with your team skill set and available resources

If your team doesn’t have the necessary skills to enable successful engagement, then you must either train them or figure out how you are going to obtain the necessary skills from elsewhere eg terminating employees or re-assigning them to different roles. Without the right people to do the planning, integration, execution, listening, engagement and measurement, you will be doomed to continue to struggle.

This is evident In the Malaysia political arena. Political parties’ cybertroopers or social media team would rather go about their happy retweeting, demeaning and scolding peeps whose ideals differ from theirs. It is amazing how BN (UMNO, MCA, etc) is spending much $$$ on their social media and web team to only able to produce numbers of followers, bragging about retweets and top influencers who they are engaging with.

Shockingly, the paymasters didn’t even have the gumption to realise the lack of engagement ability of their social media people.

If you are only talking to yourself all day and ignoring your target audience or leaving them out of conversation because you have no understanding of what they want to talk about or what they need, then it is highly unlikely you will ever see a solid return on that social media and expensive web team you hired.

The BN social media teams are well on their way to being nothing to nobody.

Be good to your business, it is never too late to go get yourself a top social media listener/manager today.

April 8, 2012

Why your constituents aren’t giving you their vote

Filed under: Citizenry, Government, Malaysia, Politics — Tags: , , , , , , — bananachinese @ 12:59 pm

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Why folks who voted your party in the past are not responding to you as passionately now?

For this Malaysia general election (which date may happen now or later at Mr Najib Razak’s whim/fancy/superstition), it is normal to have candidates and aspiring candidates sweating hot over this issue.

Let me venture some reasons why voters passion diverted:

1.  They didn’t receive your message.
2.  They don’t know you.
3.  Your messengers turned them off

 

Feel free to add more to this list, folks!

February 21, 2012

Stars: Can we still have them like they used to?

Remember the poise and how stars used carry their business with the public?

After Teresa Teng came Fong Fei Fei.

Public perception is so very important in this dog eat dog world, especially for those in public’s eye, don’t you think so?

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MCA, hope you heed this. Your members are way behind in this area.

Read public reactions to MCA’s Jessie Ooi who attracted attention with her emotional off topic issues during Q&A session at the debate between Chua Soi Lek and Lim Guan Eng on 18 Feb 2012 organised by ASLI and INSAP.

Trivia time:

Did you know that Jessie Ooi the MCA Beliawanis Selangor chief also happens to be the Penyelaras BN for Selayang? Datuk Donald Lim Siang Chai is rumoured to be eying to be candidate for Selayang this GE13. It will be interesting if Jessie will give Donald hell if he does any misstep during campaign, hehehee.

Find out for yourself readers’ comments and reactions to her behaviour at Malaysiakini here.

February 13, 2012

The trouble with Valentine’s Day in Malaysia

Filed under: Citizenry, Malaysia, Media, Politics — Tags: , , , , , — bananachinese @ 2:51 pm

Why, oh why, nobody in Malaysia media or its band of journalists dare to grab this opportunity to write a good piece on this issue?

Every year we are treated with news of political parties sparring with each other over Valentine’s Day. Some doing so to protect the followers’ faith and the other wanting to appear as liberals to champion for all.

And not helping at all are journalists/reporters who produced fluffy response pieces to this yearly drama.

Hey journos, if you even dare, read below link, maybe this can help you to try to produce an article that can contribute more to make Malaysians more enlightened, ok?

The myth of Valentine’s Day exposed.

Really, the standard of analysis/journalism in newspapers and internet media is rolling down the hill *cue for Adele’s song Rolling In The Deep*.

Pity, our journos must have suffered so much from lowered public esteem that they are unable to see the way to produce international standards journalism/reporting.

I wonder what it will take to get National Union of Journalists (NUJ) to encourage its members, take this opportunity to write pieces to guide children or young adults to be better informed by triggering conversations like:

1) Where did these customs originate?

2) How did we inherit these customs?

3) Where do we find this practiced in our culture?

But, if the newspaper bosses think the current low standards of reporting is the best KPI for Malaysian readers, I rest my case.

For those interested to know more about Valentine Day’s industry (yes, this is a BIG money churner for entertainment/ F&B/ hotel, newspaper and media related businesses), go check out history books and encyclopedias at the library.

December 27, 2011

Sabahans, wouldn’t you want to know?

Filed under: Citizenry, Malaysia, Media, Politics, Repair — Tags: , , , , , , , — bananachinese @ 5:10 pm

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See if you can sniff out the most important point in below piece of news:


Air crash more than historical event – Jeffrey

KOTA KINABALU: United Borneo Front (UBF) chairman Datuk Dr Jeffrey Kitingan told the court that the air crash on June 6, 1976 that killed former Chief Minister Tun Fuad Stephens and all 10 others on board a Nomad aircraft is more than a historical event.

Jeffrey, 63, said it was a tragedy of huge proportions not only affecting the families of the crash victims but also affecting the State and the future of its people.

He said he did not know the real causes of the incident but he would like to know and was curious to know what really happened on that fateful day.

“I really would like to know what happened before that as it might have significant implications after the event,” Jeffrey said during examination-in-chief by counsel Datuk Simon Shim.

He said from his understanding of the causes of the incident after reading the papers the next day after the crash and also read books about it later, at that time there were people merely speculating as no investigation had been done at that time.

“From what I read, they talked about possibilities such as overloading, pilot error, maybe technical defect.

“These are being speculated upon at that time and when you think about it, this speculation raises more questions than answers,” he said.

Jeffrey was testifying before Justice Dato’ Abdul Rahman Sebli on the on-going hearing of a RM50 million suit brought by Tan Sri Harris Salleh against Sabah Progressive Party (SAPP) president Datuk Yong Teck Lee and the party for allegedly insinuating that he (Harris) was involved in causing the plane crash.

Simon is the counsel for Yong and the party who are the first and second respondents respectively.

Harris, 81, who filed the suit on June 6, last year, is claiming for general damages, aggravated and exemplary damages of not less than RM50 million to be assessed separately against Yong and SAPP as the first and second defendants respectively.

He is also seeking an injunction to restrain the defendants whether by themselves or their servants or employees or agents from printing and publishing further the statements and similar libel in any form or means.
Harris is represented by counsels Yunof Maringking and Trevor Maringking.

To another question from Simon, Jeffrey said he was still interested to know what happened as there had been so many unanswered questions.

“This is a big tragedy involving half of the cabinet ministers and they were supposed to be in Labuan to sign an oil agreement and from what we know, the agreement was not signed and there was a crash including the Chief Minister (CM) who was supposed to sign the agreement.

“And then one week later it was signed by the next CM who took over who was not in that plane and who invited the Petronas chief, the other party to the agreement, out of the plane to another plane.

“So won’t you want to know? Would that not raise so many questions? Would that not lead to so many speculations? Some may even speculate that this incident might have been planned, otherwise why did this tragedy happen? Why was the agreement not signed? Why some people went out of the plane? Why was the agreement rushed when the State and the families were still in mourning?” he questioned.

To a further question from Simon, Jeffrey told the court that on the evening of April 2, 2010, he attended a talk by Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah entitled, ‘Minyak Sabah Siapa Punya?’

In that talk, Jeffrey said Tengku Razaleigh was talking about the history of Petronas such as how Petronas was formed and his role in it and whether the five per cent royalty could ever be changed.

Jeffrey said Razaleigh in his speech had also talked about the air crash which really disturbed him.

“He said he was very sad whenever he comes to Sabah because he was being reminded of this incident and he described that particular happening in which he said he was seated in the plane and was already strapped with his safety belt when Datuk Harris came and invited him out and another person to join him in another plane. He said Datuk Harris invited him to visit his cattle farm in Banggi,” he said.

The defendant’s sixth witness said he had never heard of this information disclosed by Tengku Razaleigh and when he heard it, he was shocked and there were murmuring in the hall and then there was complete silence after that.

He said at that time he was also talking to himself that this could be crucial information, and to find out more on what actually happened that day and before that.

“And it could well lead to the truth and maybe give Sabah the opportunity to go back to the 1976 agreement. I am sure people will be equally shocked by the revelation,” he stressed.

When asked by Simon whether the new information as revealed by Tengku Razaleigh merits a new investigation into the incident, Jeffrey said: “Precisely.”

From this new information, Jeffrey said he thought that the oil royalty agreement might be void.

“It seems to me that there are so many unanswered questions, so many doubts that lead me to believe that if you put together this doubt and this question, you begin to wonder why the oil agreement was not signed in Labuan; why some people left the plane against the protocol; why the plane mysteriously crashed; why certain people left the plane just to see a cattle farm; why these said people survive to sign the agreement; why the agreement was rushed to be signed given the tragedy of such magnitude; why didn’t the state government take the opportunity to bring this to the State Legislative Assembly or the Cabinet before it was signed,” he questioned.

“It seems to me that when you look at the whole scenario before, in between and after the incident, it gives you the feeling that something is at play here, meaning, could the state government be under pressure to succumb to the demand of the federal government?”

He also questioned why would any state government or leader want to surrender or give away fundamental state resource at five per cent?

“Don’t you think this is ridiculous; where is the negotiation? I have not heard of any negotiation about the oil agreement between the state and the federal governments,” he said.

He pointed out that under Article 4 of the Petroleum Development Act, the cash payment to the federal government or the state government is subject to agreement between the parties.

“As I said before, it would be stupid of the state to simply agree to give away this fundamental state resource called oil and gas at merely a payment of five per cent. And not only that – why should the state government in this agreement that they signed even waive the five per cent royalty, meaning you not only give away the oil resources but you also give away a royalty of five per cent and accepted a cash payment of five per cent when you could have 10 per cent even if you have given away the oil for five per cent cash payment.

“So because of this, I tend to believe that there is coercion and pressure from the federal government that leads me to say that this agreement is invalid,” he said.

Meanwhile during cross-examination by Trevor, Jeffrey agreed that those present including him did not ask Tengku Razaleigh about the so-called new information as they would not want to put him in an embarrassing situation in public. He however disagreed with Trevor’s suggestion that there was no direct call from the former for re-investigation since there was already a call made by Yong and that he (Jeffrey) merely supported the call by making the statement on April 6, 2010.

To another question from Trevor, Jeffrey agreed with the counsel’s suggestion that there was an official investigation into the air crash and it was reported in the newspaper at that time.

He disagreed with Trevor’s suggestion that the reason why he and his deputy Daniel John Jambun did not proceed further to insist on the call for re-investigation was because he knew that there was no link at all by the statement of Tengku Razaleigh and the case of the air crash in relation to the plaintiff.

When suggested by Trevor that the second defendant had made a call or invitation to members of UBF which is headed by him to stand under the party in the upcoming general election, Jeffrey said: “I am not aware or seen any such invitation.”

He further disagreed with Trevor’s suggestion that it was in his interest that the second defendant did not lose this case because UBF was working together with the second defendant in the upcoming general election.

Meanwhile, when Yunof suggested that there was silence among the audience who attended Tengku Razaleigh’s talk because most of those in attendance were not yet born when the air crash happened and did not know the facts until the first defendant sensationalised what Tengku Razaleigh revealed in his introductory speech, Jeffrey said he disagreed with the suggestion.

Jeffrey also disagreed with Yunof’s suggestion that since the ownership of petroleum onshore or offshore of Sabah had already been vested into Petronas by virtue of Section 2 of the Petroleum Development Act, there was no need to sacrifice so many leaders in order to force Sabah to sign or accept the five per cent cash payment under the agreement that was supposed to have been signed on June 6, 1976.

December 16, 2011

System error?

Filed under: Citizenry, Government, Malaysia, Politics, Repair — Tags: , , , , , , — bananachinese @ 7:44 pm

Negri Sembilan MCA chief Dr. Yeow Chai Thiam caused a minor brohaha recently when he disclosed his generous helping an opposition politician’s mother and was not thanked for the assistance. That subtly implied Teo Nie Ching (MP for Serdang) needed to be vocally thankful for his helping her mother who was in need of medical assistance some time ago.

But let us not get caught in the silly business of needing to be publicly thankful or grateful to politicians who offered social welfare/charities as their core business instead of law & policy making.

So for voting rakyat, the most important questions to ask of BN and particularly of MCA are:

1. Why are we having a health system whereby sick people need to get MCA bigwigs’ assistance in order to get proper medical attention”?

2. Is such a system being deliberately created by the BN government so that their party leaders can demonstrate their ‘importance’?

Thanks to a commentator by name of ONG who posted the very pertinent question here

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Hey, I’m not totally against MCA, but if MCA needs to get beyond GE13, its leaders and veterans need to clean up after itself before even thinking of contesting. Wiser for these oldies to just backoff and let new faces rise up to be MCA candidates.

btw, Can somebody clarify if Yeow Chai Thiam is a real doctor who took the hippocratic oath, doctor-patient confidentiality or a PhD graduate?

Hopefully medical doctors today will not take oath-taking as little more than a ritual with little value beyond that of upholding tradition of that time honoured profession.

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