Bananachinese’s Weblog

March 12, 2010

TM’s High Speed Broadband (HSBB) and photo

“This is a broadband service offering network speeds of up to 4.0Mbps delivered via wired, wireless and mobile technologies such as ADSL, wi-fi, WiMax and high-speed downlink packet access and is available nationwide,” said TM Group chief executive officer, Dato’ Zamzamzairani Mohd Isa.

I’m not going to compare Malaysia’s network speed with Korea’s 14.6 Mbps. Really.

Why?

Cos Malaysia got to replace those oldie physical copper wires with fiber ones before we can speed up the virtual internet autobahn like them Koreans. If you are a KL night owl, you might have noticed those TM contractors working feverishly digging out copper wires and replacing with fiber cables.

No fiber, no real speed. Reality sucks, doesn’t it.

And until Malaysia is truly fibered, we’re stuck in between dreams of surfing up to 4.0Mbps, I guess.
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Having been using Streamyx’s 1.0Mbps for so long, I jumped at a friend’s invite to test out the High Speed Broad Band (HSBB) a few week ago.

If you have tried watching CNN at peak time with ye Streamyx, you’ll know that it is a stop and go watch. But HSBB, no problem, streaming is very steady, no interuption to the CNN live videos.

Haven’t tested video upload speed to Youtube using HSBB, yet. Need to try before giving more praise (if applicable).

btw, I wish TM will be less coy and let consumers know when the HSBB real deal will be available to all other places beyond the Bangsar, Taman Tun Dr Ismail, Shah Alam and Subang Jaya areas. Don’t la expect busy consumers to search through your TM website for the information, netizens are not paid to do that.

Anyways, if TM really want to convert us to HSBB, put lar TM big, big ads with enticing subscription fees to grab our eyeballs at places where we meet/talk in the internet. I don’t mind hosting a paid ad or two in me blog (heeheeheehee)

Here’s to affordable HSBB, speed and access to information so important to drive the Malaysian high income economy dream.

To drool over HSBB gadgets, see photo below.

March 4, 2010

Malaysia Netroots and Citizen Bloggers

Ever wonder if our savvy politicians are even aware of the changing pattern of communication of our loyal party grassroot voters?

Let’s do a checklist:

Got blog? – check

Got Facebook and Twitter? – check

Got interactive conversation to walk with and connect with commentators’ fears and tears? – “Itu software belum lagi di pasaran, boss…,” explained the hapless political aide. “Pergi tanya dekat bloggers,” exclaimed the half awake politician.

Suddenly a vision pops in my head – she, the internet evangelist grandma in a TV advertisement going, “Jom Streamyx !!”

Share with you below highlights from a related article:

Rise of the Netroots: How citizen army of bloggers is changing Malaysian politics

Malaysian politicians need to rise up with the digital reality and collaborate with social-political new media practitioners to extend constituencies beyond their silver haired circle of loyalist voters. Never before has the need to connect with today’s digital-savvy consumers been so crucial to winning campaigns for a high income economy aspirant nation state.

Thanks to information technology, the possible spectrum for ideological debate in Malaysia has been widen a little especially since the advent of emails, blogs, sms, Youtube, Facebook and Twitter dented the traditionally unidirectional political messaging and campaigning that voters have been subjected to.

So instead of issuing numbing political slogans or lamentations of political parties attributing their troubles to the machinations of their adversaries rather than to their own failures or sheer misfortune, why don’t they just get to work with the netroots as an outreach connector to reach constituents beyond their traditional voters neatly segmented by race, association or party membership?

Click here to read the article in full.

February 12, 2010

Protect and uphold rights of civilians from harm: The strange case of Norizan bte Salleh

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It is mandated by law that our Polis DiRaja‘s duty is to uphold and protect the rights of civilians to peaceful existence.

Remember when older Malaysians reminiscence fondly of the British administration which established Malaysia’s ‘mata-mata’ solid reputation for their discipline and policing skills during the colonial times?

But in Malaysia’s modern democracy, we seem to be hearing more stories claiming abuse and deaths caused by police onto those whose crimes or punishment have yet to be determined and sentenced by the judiciary.

Today, we hear of the strange case of a 30 year old single mother, Norizan bte Salleh, whose submission to Suhakam commissioner N Siva Subramaniam , claimed:

1)  to have sustained 5 gunshot wounds when policemen opened fire on a car she was traveling in.

2)  was travelling in a car when the incident happened. Without justification, police shot at the car from behind, the bullets penetrating through the body of the car and hitting Norizan who was seated at the back seat.

3)  after being shot, Norizan was then kicked and stepped on by the police personnel despite bleeding profusely from being shot.

4)  to have lodged a police report on 16.11.2009 complaining of attempted murder by police, but no action has been taken by the authorities against the culprits.

5)  has never been charged in court for any crime.

6)  she has suffered serious injuries including permanent damage to her hand. A bullet lodged close to her heart had to be removed by surgery at Institut Jantung Negara.

It is understandable to hear reactions of horror when the public read of above such ‘imbalance of treatment’ onto a civilian by the police.

We have heard one woman’s story above.

We now need to hear the police’s side of the story.

Especially the police’s policy and SOP on safeguarding civilians and even those under surveillance to reassure all citizens and visitors that their right to justice is secure by law.

A high income economy as aspired by Najib Razak’s 1Malaysia cannot afford for its law enforcement agency’s capability to be relegated or KPI-ed by the people under the Wild, Wild, West (WWW) category.

January 17, 2010

Dreaming of a high income economy? Legislate 1Malaysia now

Malaysia now has to deal with legal complexities which were never there before in 1963 but now affecting our livestyles because of economic progress.

Prime Minister Najib Razak’s 1Malaysia concept was supposed to unite all races, specifically, bring Sabah and Sarawak closer to Peninsula Malaysia as 1Malaysia.

The people welcome the overarching concept of unity in diversity, a 1Malaysia happy family, happily connected to each other, to and fro the Sabah, Sarawak and Peninsula – to work, to play, to live in peace.

It got Air Asia Berhad flying 1Malaysia back and forth more busily than a bee. LRTs, Monorails, KTM Komuter and Rapid KL buses are moving more and more 1Malaysians back and forth kampungs to towns and cities daily.

This pot has melted so that now we cannot easily distinguish easily who is a Peninsula Malay/Chinese/Indian or a Sabahan, a Sarawakian or even an Indonesian anymore.

Multicultural 1Malaysians living in harmony, each assured of their right to practice religions as appropriate as safeguarded by customs and customary rights agreed upon since 1963.

And then it happen, with a High Court ruling on 31 Dec 2009 which ruled that the Herald can use the word ‘Allah’ in its Bahasa edition.

News reported of hurt feelings of Muslims of Peninsula Malaysia, with anecdotal evidences like, “My friends all never use Allah in their prayers.”

Is that the situation with our Sabah or Sarawak friends?

UPKO President, Tan Sri Bernard Dompok testified it has been customary for Sabah and Sarawak Christians using word Allah in their prayers.

“With the greatest of respect to those who may feel uncomfortable with me mentioning this, the Christian community, not unlike the Christians in Indonesia and the Arab world, has been using this word for a long time. And it will be a herculean task for the government, if indeed it wants, to enforce the prohibition of the word in Christian worship.”

We read news of groups representing rights of Muslims of Peninsula Malaysia appealing to the Agong and Sultans to protect their rights to exclusive use ‘Allah’.

Aren’t the states of Peninsula Malaysia already doing it?
The State enactments have been protecting Muslim rights for a very long time already.

Malaysia has the Federal Law and State Laws and we live them, yes?

But then we hear politicians Datuk Jamil Khir Baharom (PM’s office) and Datuk Clarence Bongkos Malakun (Justice of Peace, Deputy President of Sabah Kadazandusun Culture Association) advising non-Muslims who are using the term ‘Allah’ to stop doing so in the name of preserving peace and to placate hurt feelings.

Why are lawmakers asking rakyat of the states of Sabah and Sarawak (who has been assured of their customary practices in 1963) to give up their customary rights?

It also begs the question, is it legal to ask Sabah and Sarawak Malaysians working in Peninsula Malaysia, who are exercising the customary usage of “Allah” in their prayers, to relinguish their right in religion when in Peninsula?

We remember the guarantees which Sabah and Sarawak asked for, from the Cobbold Report which recorded:

“The non-Muslim communities are most insistent that there should be complete religious freedom as to worship, education, and propagation, in the Borneo territories.

We recommend the insertion in the State Constitution of a specific provision to this effect.

“There remain the provisions in the existing Federal Constitution of Malaya that Islam is the national religion and that certain public expenditure may be incurred for Islamic purposes. All Muslim communities would welcome the provision that Islam should be the national religion of the Federation. But even with guarantees of freedom of religion for the Borneo States, we have met with strong resistance from many non-Muslim communities to the idea that these Federal provisions should apply to the Borneo territories. We consider that this is a matter for the peoples of the Borneo territories (which have a non-Muslim majority) to decide for themselves at a later stage when fully elected representative bodies have been constituted. We recommend therefore that the Federal provisions should not be extended to the Borneo territories in the meantime.” “

Malaysia laws needs serious attention and ministration by its legislators to conduct regular maintenance and fine tuning the health and position of the laws of Malaysia.

Our Yang Berhormats cannot continue to dodge the effects of modernity or to abdicate its duty to provide a legislative framework that works to protect personal and business rights.

Legislation, not rhetoric is crucial to the Malaysia aspiration to transform herself into a high income economy.

Back up the legislation as an unflinching assurance to foreign investors that their investments will be safeguarded by the Laws of Malaysia if they take their business to Malaysia.

Legislate for 1Malaysia transformation now.

By: Ho Aoi Ling
The writer was a former Senior Research Executive with MCA think tank, INSAP.

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Reference links:

http://www.heraldmalaysia.com/news/storydetails.php/Daring-speech-by-Tan-Sri-Bernard-Dompok/3346-2-1
http://www.theedgemalaysia.com/political-news/157199-jamil-khir-other-church-leaders-should-adopt-same-approach.html

http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/index.php/malaysia/49845-four-reasons-for-controversial-allah-ruling

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