Bananachinese’s Weblog

April 14, 2011

Sarawak and the Chinese connection

Here’s an interesting telling of deep links of Chinese communities in Sarawak influencing the government. If SUPP fail to have a good show in this election to retain whatever seat they still hold in the state assembly, will the Chinese business community of Sarawak say goodbye to their economic pie? Hmmmm…

Sarawak and the Chinese scores

The unique lifestyle and ambience of the localities of Sarawak today is a result from years of goodwill, understanding, cooperation and reciprocity among its indigenous groups with the Chinese.

A visit to the Chinese Museum in Kuching offers an interesting picture of Sarawak’s politics of development over the past 30 years that have risen from the Chinese connection. A tour of this Museum is recommended for all interested to learn and apply the secret of key business successes in order to extend it into the future successes of Sarawak.

The Chinese History Museum, located on the ground of the Kuching Waterfront within a stone throw of the landmark Tua Pek Kong Temple tells an interesting story to visitors to Kuching. According to history, the compact building housing the museum was originally built in 1912 as an administrative centre and the judicial court of the local Chinese, but was taken over by the Chinese Chamber of Commerce of Kuching in 1921 until the present Museum began in 1993.

For first time oversea visitors to Kuching, the museum showcases the multiplicity aspects of the dialectical make-up of Sarawak Chinese, thus providing a clearer perspective into the make-up of the Chinese psyche.

Inside the Chinese Museum, one can immerse in the history of the arrival of Chinese to Sarawak with old pictures and photographs of the bygone eras. All the dialect groups of the Sarawak Chinese are presented here, from the Hakka, Hokkien, Foochow, Cantonese to other minor groups. History buffs would enjoy soaking up the stories and exhibits while regaling in the success stories and vast contributions of the Chinese community leaders to Sarawak.

One can connect to the hardwork and vision of these early businessmen who applied their shrewd business acumen and understood the importance to develop goodwill and friendship by working closely with the local communities to benefit the Sarawakian economy.

Among the earliest indigenous groups to have contact with the outside world is the Melanau people. The community’s long history, legendary tales and myths add colour to the Mukah locality. Melanaus have produced many notable leaders, including Tan Sri Abdul Taib Mahmud, who led Sarawak in modern times as its Chief Minister.

Many have admired and asked how a Melanau, whose community make up only 6% of Sarawak’s population can rise up and more importantly, engineered Sarawak’s development. In this case, the close link between the Chinese with their local indigenous partnership should be celebrated. The Chinese connection and united ethnic groups led by their respective political parties riding on the politics of development concept have brought success to Sarawak in the past 30 years. Its proven historical success is seen as the master key to unlock another interesting phase in Sarawak’s exciting future.

Apart from ongoing infrastructural development like roads and town expansion, Sarawak is embarking on a massive transformation with The Sarawak Corridor of Renewable Energy or simply known as SCORE, a major initiative undertaken to develop the Central Region and transform Sarawak into a developed State by the year 2020. It aims to achieve the goals of accelerating the State’s economic growth and development, as well as improving the quality of life for the people of Sarawak.

From now until 2016, the support and participation from the people of Sarawak are needed to build critical mass and momentum to trigger development, implement high priority infrastructure projects and manage high priority trigger projects. This presents a new shinning opportunity for the political leader possessing the mandatory experience and political savviness to rein in the close business cooperation of the myriad of Sarawak’s communities up to another level internationally.

By the act of harnessing on the Chinese communities and driven by the concept of politics of development, the world may read of another big success story from Sarawak.

By: Bintang Bulan

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April 10, 2011

Let a wise man makes his own decisions, an ignorant man follows public opinion

An excited friend admonished me:

“My dear BC, why are you keeping silent on the Sarawak state election? It is really exciting here in Kuching, the crowds here get to listen to really good talks by opposition every night, DAP speakers are good and entertaining, SUPP not as fiery, but seems like the new chap Dr. Sim Kui Hian is steady and looks like a very reliable politician – if he is elected lar…”

My friend… I’m still in holiday mood and will opt to not side any one party at the moment. So, Sarawakian friends will be missing out on my knify sharp political analysis this week, hehehe.

Anyways, to sooth friends who are buoyed by the highs courtesy of opposition speakers, share with you something I’ve gotten from another savvy friend.

Until next week,

Let a wise man makes his own decisions, an ignorant man follows public opinion

It is a common human fallacy to generalize issues when trying to justify one’s argument in order to KO the opponent. Who haven’t heard of someone who will say “He/she is so typical of a xxx (insert race/category of profession) therefore he/she is (insert assumption of undesirable action here).”

Let’s not be ashamed to admit it, most of us might have done it conscious or unconsciously. Even the DAP and other opposition parties tend to do this ‘natural’ thing. Usually, the members of the opposition will strike first with accusations of xxx (insert preferred presumptions of guilt before trial here). And then it is followed up by bombardments and arguments to stir up the public’s emotion with insinuated wrongdoings such as, “xxx is rich, therefore xxx is corrupted”. This is a well worn method as human beings are found to be intrigued by real or imagined scandals especially if it can blacken the image of the more famous member of the community.

But if one were to dig deeper, one will find that the argument was not wholesome and skewed to be lopsided towards the interest of the opposition. For instance, when debating issues of development, the attacker will not acknowledge truths of how the whole community has also benefited to rise up to better living as compared to their forefather’s hard environment which seriously lacked the economic public infrastructure built up since then. There was no recognition for work and effort put in by the state to satisfy and balance various communities’ demands, sensitivities and interpretations of social justice.

One is reminded how the Chinese who are generally well recognised for their belief in ‘Dao’ and that everything in the universe have a black and white perspective that balances each side for a harmonious life existence. Many Chinese sayings have been handed down since the ancient sage kings to disseminate their wisdom to guide the new generations to balance all sides of each story. Indeed, this has given rise to the general perception that all Chinese are pragmatic practitioners capable of understanding the Dao of both sides of the story before making hasty decisions.

Why not try out the Chinese way to analyze what has been given as ‘truth’ and avoid the risk falling into the trap of ‘One stick knocking down the whole village’. Don’t you think it is a great injustice to deny the work of many good people from the village who has silently contributed to make our lives better today?

by: Bintang Bulan

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