Bananachinese’s Weblog

August 1, 2011

The Admonitions Scroll

Filed under: Malaysia, Politics, Scandal — Tags: , , , , , , , — bananachinese @ 4:33 pm

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To rise to glory
is as hard as
to build a mountain out of dust;

To fall into calamity
is as easy as
the rebound of a tense spring.

Source: The Admonitions Scroll

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July 19, 2011

No escape from new media effect

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Any advertisement or Public Relations companies which do not have political experts/section, please do not attempt to  do political campaign or anything politics. Your political client’s future may be in danger because of your inadequacy.

*shudder for BN and PR*

Share with you article found published in Malaysia-today on 14 July 2011:

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Unfortunately for stakeholders in Barisan Nasional and Pakatan Rakyat, Malaysia’s political rhythm for the upcoming 13th general election has changed to a new beat from 9 July 2011.

In this new political landscape where the rakyat hold supreme in the choice between Barisan and Pakatan, any forward looking players should now be urgently re-thinking their choice of campaign managers and teams who will play an important role to make or break the political incumbents’ careers or aspirants’ dreams.

Compared with Pakatan which has adopted heavy use of new media much earlier, Barisan is running behind in the race to articulate its messages on this platform. Whether by choice or due to an inability to engineer a mindset turnaround, Barisan’s team has also missed out chances to update its messaging and repair missed touchpoints. Perhaps it might be in serious need of a major overhaul of its voter communication bureaucracies.

For the influential segment of middle class voters who possess more confidence to make a stand on issues and demand for intelligent discourse, BN’s incongruent messages do not synchronize with the people’s vision of 1Malaysia. The incongruous noise also implies a lack of updated skills in political messaging by Barisan’s campaigners, promoters, speakers and spokesmen. One also suspects non-existent political knowhow in the advertising companies managing the BN coalition parties’ or candidate’s media accounts.

Some voters might recall being bombarded by ‘unreal’ messages from political advertisements mostly carried in mainstream newspapers in the 12th general election campaign. Due to its misalignment to voters’ sentiment, some might recall being amused by BN’s manifesto’s theme ‘Selamat, Aman, Makmur’ or MCA’s ad depicting its President still cycling around the new village.

Those messages may have worked well in the days before new media became a daily work, communication and information essential.

According to the Election Commission, Malaysia has 11.82 million registered voters after the supplementary electoral roll for the fourth quarter of 2010 was gazetted recently. In June 2010, there were 16.9 million internet users in Malaysia (representing 64.6% of the population) according to Internet World Stats.

Certainly these data presents a huge opportunity to extend the power of messaging beyond traditional platforms or hardsell to reach the hearts and minds of Gen X and Y families, especially the new voters.

The new media platform exposes its users to diverse perspectives and is a tool to politicize younger people. Today’s voters are disengaged from the traditional ideas of political loyalty and places more value on issues of governance and civil discourse.

Today’s middle class talk about values and rights of an individual. It may even be perceived as a form of cruelty, a turnoff or politically incorrect behavior to cast aspersion via character assassination or cliché to bespattering someone with metaphorical mud. Thence, it was no surprise that individuals ‘guilty’ of moral indiscretions were elected or appointed to office as the value creation from harnessing their career skills carried more weightage against other considerations.

No longer bound to thought limitations of mainstream newspapers, radio and television, your fellow citizens are free to watch and compare ideas on the worldwide internet almost everyday and communicate their expanded worldview to share with their families, relatives and friends in the rural areas or globally.

This complicates and presents a huge challenge to candidates contesting in the urban and semi-urban constituencies. Any political campaigners worth their salt must possess listening experience on the internet before embarking on the political trail to try to persuade voters to listen to their candidate’s message.

As always for political players and stakeholders, fresh approaches to politics are absolutely necessary to convince voters beyond traditional offers of lunch, dinner or charity.

There is no escaping the new media effect and for sure, at any given time, the world may be watching and sharing through the internet what one is saying today or have said yesterday.

By: Ho Aoi Ling
The writer is a social media listening specialist and heads an independent think tank in Kuala Lumpur. She may be reached at cleat.clew@gmail.com or Twitter http://twitter.com/aoiling

June 2, 2011

Would you elect an MCA candidate as your Member of Parliament or ADUN?

Filed under: Citizenry, Forum, Malaysia, Politics — Tags: , , , , — bananachinese @ 3:25 pm

May 6, 2011

Guilty. Malaysia Members of Parliament

Was too angry to post anything last few days.

How can one not be angry when a good man was betrayed in death by the laws of the country and a man who caused his sufferings and eventual death was virtually let off with a slap on the wrist? Imagine his family’s feelings at being let down by law.

Read this.

Do you know, we cannot blame the courts or the judge, as they can only be guided by laws set by Parliament. We have to be aware the instrument to protect the country and its people is the Malaysia laws and in this case, the transport laws have not moved with the times!

How come important laws have not been updated before we were told by Najib Razak that we should dream to become a high income nation?

What have all our Member of Parliaments and NGOs been doing all these years? So busy with Barisan Nasional or Pakatan Rakyat partisanship that they neglected to fight to update laws to protect the real rakyat?

Don’t give me the excuse ‘because one is not the government, one cannot do anything’. It is now time to name and find out if any of our MPs has been faithfully ‘memperjuangkan’ laws be updated to protect the rakyat. Let’s see if we can make up even a minimum total of 10% from the 222 MPs in the house fulfiling their responsibility to push for laws updating.

MPs, you are the ones who should say sorry to the nation, you are part of the body responsible that made Malaysians lives cheap enough for hit and run perpetrators all these years.

This coming general election, we must question all election candidates thoroughly before we even consider to donate a vote to them – Ask them bluntly and demand for substantive reply on what will they do to push laws to be updated so that justice can be fair to the people, or a husband, a father, a grandfather like Ong Kim Koon. Rakyat should not be apologetically relegated to just a number in the statistics just because of archaic laws – MPs do you job or risk be replaced in next GE.

Still am very angry.

April 29, 2011

Wen JiaBao’s China

Filed under: Citizenry, Government, Malaysia, Politics — Tags: , , , , , — bananachinese @ 2:17 pm

A news from one of China’s embassies in the world says:

On the afternoon of April 27, local time, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao arrived in Kuala Lumpur by special plane for an official visit to Malaysia. This visit is his first in six years.

In a written speech delivered at the airport, Wen said that Malaysia is a friendly neighbor of China and the two peoples share a time-honored traditional friendship. Since the establishment of diplomatic ties 37 years ago, bilateral ties have been developing rapidly with frequent high-level visits, close people-to-people exchanges and fruitful cooperation in all areas. He said as developing countries, China and Malaysia had a lot of common interests and that deepening bilateral strategic cooperation in the new situation was in the fundamental interest of both nations and peoples and was also helpful to the stability and prosperity of the region.

During the visit, Wen is expected to discuss with his Malaysian counterpart Najib on bilateral ties and other international and regional issues of common concern and engage broadly with friends from many fields in Malaysia. “I hope that this visit will promote the traditional friendship between the two countries, deepen reciprocal cooperation and elevate the strategic cooperation between China and Malaysia to a higher level,” Wen said.

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Want to know what does China stand for? First, we must learn some of its age old maxims.

“In learning, age and youth go for nothing: the best informed takes the precedence.”

What  it means:

The chief source of rank and consideration in China is certainly cultivated talent; and whatever may be the character of the learning on which it is exercised, this at least is a more legitimate as well as more beneficial object of respect, than the vulgar pretensions of wealth and fashion, or the accidental ones of mere birth.

Wealth alone, though it has of course some necessary influence, is looked upon with less respect, comparatively, than perhaps in any other country; and this because all distinction and rank arises almost entirely from educated talent. The choice of official persons, who form the real aristocracy of China, is guided, with a very few exceptions, by the possession of those qualities, and the country is therefore as ably ruled as it could be under the circumstances.

Oh, don’t forget this from the country acknowledged as a master in the art of government:

“To violate the law, is the same crime in the Emperor as in a subject.”

April 27, 2011

BN’s headache: Chua Soi Lek and the MCA problem

Filed under: Citizenry, Government, Malaysia, Politics — Tags: , , , , , , , — bananachinese @ 7:17 pm

No need to write my 2 sens worth when Mr/Ms ‘election observer’ says it all:

“The real problem for MCA is that it lacks credible leaders.

The Chinese sees MCA leaders as self-serving [look at the party elections, the running down of its own leaders in MCA by different factions within the party and the inability to unite after party elections].

It is made worse by having CSL as president, a person whose morality is in question. The Chinese [the voting public not MCA members] do not hold him in high esteem and likewise the UMNO leaders and members in all likelihood. Hence, whatever CSL may say, only few will listen to him. Instead of advising other parties like SUPP not to join the Sarawak state cabinet.

It is time for CSL and his supporters to let new capable leaders who have no fear of losing cabinet positions and personal gains take over MCA, leaders who dare tell UMNO to treat them with dignity and fairness or else they are prepared to work outside Barisan [not just say it but mean it].

And don’t worry or pretend to worry that the Chinese will be worse off without MCA’s participation in the government. We have heard this talk before, believe me the Chinese will survive without MCA in the Barisan government.”

hmmmm… makes one wonder why the current batch of MCA leaders are so helplessly unworthy in their community’s eye.  Some said MCA’s leadership is obsolete and has expired a long time ago. If I were Chua Soi Lek and gang, I’d retreat and let the party have a real election for real leaders (for once).

Find the MCA leaders here

There are also 2 burning question from a friend: “Why the majority of the Chinese want to vote for opposition? Was it because MCA had betrayed them for the past 53 years?”

April 10, 2011

Let a wise man makes his own decisions, an ignorant man follows public opinion

An excited friend admonished me:

“My dear BC, why are you keeping silent on the Sarawak state election? It is really exciting here in Kuching, the crowds here get to listen to really good talks by opposition every night, DAP speakers are good and entertaining, SUPP not as fiery, but seems like the new chap Dr. Sim Kui Hian is steady and looks like a very reliable politician – if he is elected lar…”

My friend… I’m still in holiday mood and will opt to not side any one party at the moment. So, Sarawakian friends will be missing out on my knify sharp political analysis this week, hehehe.

Anyways, to sooth friends who are buoyed by the highs courtesy of opposition speakers, share with you something I’ve gotten from another savvy friend.

Until next week,

Let a wise man makes his own decisions, an ignorant man follows public opinion

It is a common human fallacy to generalize issues when trying to justify one’s argument in order to KO the opponent. Who haven’t heard of someone who will say “He/she is so typical of a xxx (insert race/category of profession) therefore he/she is (insert assumption of undesirable action here).”

Let’s not be ashamed to admit it, most of us might have done it conscious or unconsciously. Even the DAP and other opposition parties tend to do this ‘natural’ thing. Usually, the members of the opposition will strike first with accusations of xxx (insert preferred presumptions of guilt before trial here). And then it is followed up by bombardments and arguments to stir up the public’s emotion with insinuated wrongdoings such as, “xxx is rich, therefore xxx is corrupted”. This is a well worn method as human beings are found to be intrigued by real or imagined scandals especially if it can blacken the image of the more famous member of the community.

But if one were to dig deeper, one will find that the argument was not wholesome and skewed to be lopsided towards the interest of the opposition. For instance, when debating issues of development, the attacker will not acknowledge truths of how the whole community has also benefited to rise up to better living as compared to their forefather’s hard environment which seriously lacked the economic public infrastructure built up since then. There was no recognition for work and effort put in by the state to satisfy and balance various communities’ demands, sensitivities and interpretations of social justice.

One is reminded how the Chinese who are generally well recognised for their belief in ‘Dao’ and that everything in the universe have a black and white perspective that balances each side for a harmonious life existence. Many Chinese sayings have been handed down since the ancient sage kings to disseminate their wisdom to guide the new generations to balance all sides of each story. Indeed, this has given rise to the general perception that all Chinese are pragmatic practitioners capable of understanding the Dao of both sides of the story before making hasty decisions.

Why not try out the Chinese way to analyze what has been given as ‘truth’ and avoid the risk falling into the trap of ‘One stick knocking down the whole village’. Don’t you think it is a great injustice to deny the work of many good people from the village who has silently contributed to make our lives better today?

by: Bintang Bulan

March 22, 2011

Update: Nobody watched ‘blue’ movie in Parliament

Filed under: Announcement, Citizenry, Government, Malaysia, Parliament — Tags: , , , — bananachinese @ 1:29 pm

Here’s an update on my previous post – Nazri Aziz has now come out to protect sanctity of Parliament.

Nobody watched ‘blue’ movie in Parliament: Nazri (read Malaysiakini here)

March 2, 2011

Why democratic elections and political reform?

Filed under: Announcement, Citizenry, Government, Malaysia, Parliament, Politics — Tags: , , , — bananachinese @ 6:59 pm

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1Malaysia wanna move on up with China? Do this….

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There is a need to hold democratic elections according to the law; have democratic decision making, democratic management as well as democratic supervision; safeguard people’s right to know, to participate, to express and to supervise.

Political reform, including opportunities for citizens to criticise and monitor the government, is necessary to sustain economic growth. Otherwise, the country’s economic gains would be lost.

February 8, 2011

And the KPI for MCA so far…

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , , , — bananachinese @ 2:00 pm

Ouch…. what a stinging review for MCA’s political relevance in 1Malaysia…

MCA worked harder than usual to save face for MCA President Soi Lek but they are best described as “lembab.” He maybe the MCA president but he must face up to the fact that he is not accepted by the Labis constituency and MCA supporters.

He must stop being in-denial to the reality that MCA is weak and in need of help. A weaker partner cannot rank pari passu with a more superior partner. He must put aside his ego and be willing to get assistance and take orders from the stronger partner.

BN was able to regain back a slim majority in the Chinese mix areas of Bandar Labis Timor and Labis due to the return of Malay and Indian voters. Chinese predominated area of Bandar Labis Tengah remain a significant opposition DAP stronghold.

A report claimed that Chinese support for BN is only 27 percent which is lower than the 30 something percent of the average national figure in 2008. Chinese support is not back yet.

Read more here:

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