Bananachinese’s Weblog

April 29, 2011

Wen JiaBao’s China

Filed under: Citizenry, Government, Malaysia, Politics — Tags: , , , , , — bananachinese @ 2:17 pm

A news from one of China’s embassies in the world says:

On the afternoon of April 27, local time, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao arrived in Kuala Lumpur by special plane for an official visit to Malaysia. This visit is his first in six years.

In a written speech delivered at the airport, Wen said that Malaysia is a friendly neighbor of China and the two peoples share a time-honored traditional friendship. Since the establishment of diplomatic ties 37 years ago, bilateral ties have been developing rapidly with frequent high-level visits, close people-to-people exchanges and fruitful cooperation in all areas. He said as developing countries, China and Malaysia had a lot of common interests and that deepening bilateral strategic cooperation in the new situation was in the fundamental interest of both nations and peoples and was also helpful to the stability and prosperity of the region.

During the visit, Wen is expected to discuss with his Malaysian counterpart Najib on bilateral ties and other international and regional issues of common concern and engage broadly with friends from many fields in Malaysia. “I hope that this visit will promote the traditional friendship between the two countries, deepen reciprocal cooperation and elevate the strategic cooperation between China and Malaysia to a higher level,” Wen said.

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Want to know what does China stand for? First, we must learn some of its age old maxims.

“In learning, age and youth go for nothing: the best informed takes the precedence.”

What  it means:

The chief source of rank and consideration in China is certainly cultivated talent; and whatever may be the character of the learning on which it is exercised, this at least is a more legitimate as well as more beneficial object of respect, than the vulgar pretensions of wealth and fashion, or the accidental ones of mere birth.

Wealth alone, though it has of course some necessary influence, is looked upon with less respect, comparatively, than perhaps in any other country; and this because all distinction and rank arises almost entirely from educated talent. The choice of official persons, who form the real aristocracy of China, is guided, with a very few exceptions, by the possession of those qualities, and the country is therefore as ably ruled as it could be under the circumstances.

Oh, don’t forget this from the country acknowledged as a master in the art of government:

“To violate the law, is the same crime in the Emperor as in a subject.”

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April 27, 2011

BN’s headache: Chua Soi Lek and the MCA problem

Filed under: Citizenry, Government, Malaysia, Politics — Tags: , , , , , , , — bananachinese @ 7:17 pm

No need to write my 2 sens worth when Mr/Ms ‘election observer’ says it all:

“The real problem for MCA is that it lacks credible leaders.

The Chinese sees MCA leaders as self-serving [look at the party elections, the running down of its own leaders in MCA by different factions within the party and the inability to unite after party elections].

It is made worse by having CSL as president, a person whose morality is in question. The Chinese [the voting public not MCA members] do not hold him in high esteem and likewise the UMNO leaders and members in all likelihood. Hence, whatever CSL may say, only few will listen to him. Instead of advising other parties like SUPP not to join the Sarawak state cabinet.

It is time for CSL and his supporters to let new capable leaders who have no fear of losing cabinet positions and personal gains take over MCA, leaders who dare tell UMNO to treat them with dignity and fairness or else they are prepared to work outside Barisan [not just say it but mean it].

And don’t worry or pretend to worry that the Chinese will be worse off without MCA’s participation in the government. We have heard this talk before, believe me the Chinese will survive without MCA in the Barisan government.”

hmmmm… makes one wonder why the current batch of MCA leaders are so helplessly unworthy in their community’s eye.  Some said MCA’s leadership is obsolete and has expired a long time ago. If I were Chua Soi Lek and gang, I’d retreat and let the party have a real election for real leaders (for once).

Find the MCA leaders here

There are also 2 burning question from a friend: “Why the majority of the Chinese want to vote for opposition? Was it because MCA had betrayed them for the past 53 years?”

Washing Yarn Temple

Filed under: Life, Malaysia, Repair — Tags: , , , , , — bananachinese @ 11:08 am

State plots against state
intrigues come thick and fast
but here at Washing Yarn Temple
Xi Shi offers us harmony
a pair of faces can beam
just from turning to glimpse her
while thousands of seasoned troops
ground their weapons and surrender
Fan Li achieved his greatness
by turning away from the world
while Wu Xu had to die
in order to wear down the government
the great river confers a name
upon a place like Zhuji
but this blue mountain has long been known
as a beautiful woman‘s birthplace.

April 26, 2011

On the illness of UMNO, MCA, MIC, other components and their NGOs

Filed under: Life, Malaysia, Repair — Tags: , , , , , , — bananachinese @ 4:46 pm

A physician visited the Marquis of (pick any from UMNO/MCA/MIC/other components/NGOs or if you prefer, Perkasa) and from the complexion of the latter the physician noted that he was looking at a sick man. The physician told the Marquis his observation, but not having any symptom of discomfort, the Marquis did not take heed.

Five days later, the physician saw the Marquis again and on looking at his complexion repeated his previous warning and added that his condition had worsened, but again the Marquis would not listen to him.

Another five days later the physician again met the Marquis and told him that he could observe that the Marquis’ illness had now become even worse than on the two previous occasions when they saw each other, but again the Marquis maintained that he was in good health and paid no attention to the physician.

Five days later the physician came to see the Marquis and left without uttering a word. Thinking that the physician was admitting his own mistake by keeping silent, the Marquis sent someone to ask the physician why he left without giving any advice to his lordship. The physician told the messenger that the illness of the Marquis had reached a state which no medicine could cure and no amount of medication could have any effect and hence he could not have given any useful advice.

Five days later the Marquis fell ill and quickly sent for the physician. However, the physician had already left. The Marquis died shortly afterwards.

April 25, 2011

Circle of responsibility: Lynas Corp, Pahang state government, Fuziah, MITI, BN and MCA

Bloomberg reported on 22 April:

Lynas Corp. will be barred from importing raw materials into Malaysia until the completion of a study prompted by health and safety concerns related to a processing plant the Australian developer of rare earths minerals is constructing.

The Sydney-based company won’t get a pre-operating license until the month-long independent review is complete, the Malaysian government said. The company can continue building its $220 million refinery in Pahang state while it awaits the outcome of the panel’s study, Rebecca Fatima Sta Maria, secretary-general of the Ministry of International Trade & Industry, told media in Kuala Lumpur today.

“We will never compromise the public interest in the handling of the Lynas issue,” International Trade & Industry Minister Mustapa Mohamed said. “The health and safety of our people and the environment will continue to receive the highest priority in our deliberations in this regard.”

Protests, including a march on Parliament, have escalated following leakages at nuclear power plants in Japan after last month’s earthquake and tsunami. While technologies used in rare- earth processing are different, local residents and non- governmental organizations are concerned over radiation risks and what will happen to the waste.

The company will issue a statement later, Liz Whiteway, a Lynas spokesperson, said when phoned in Kuala Lumpur today for comment.

And this response came after years of  Fuziah Salleh’s (current Kuantan MP) protest against Lynas’ intention. She blogged on 20 April:

Saya merujuk kepada kenyataan YAB MB Pahang, sewaktu menggulung titah DYMM Sultan Pahang diakhir sesi sidang DUN Pahang 19 Apr 2011

MB: Jangan cerca kami, Pahang tiada kuasa beri Lynas lessen

Kerajaan negeri Pahang tidak mempunyai kuasa untuk melulus dan menutup pembinaan kilang pemprosesan logam nadir bumi milik Syarikat Lynas Corporation Ltd dari Australia, kata Menteri Besar Datuk Seri Adnan Yaakob.

Kenyataan beliau yang mengarahkan tanggungjawab kepada Lembaga Perlesenan Atom Malaysia, sungguh tidak bertanggung jawab kerana sekiranya Kerajaan Negri Pahang tidak mengeluarkan lesen premis, maka LAMP tidak akan mendapat tapak untuk mendirikan logi mereka. Dan LAMP tidak mungkin boleh mahu mula memproses rare earth pada hari ini.

Kerajaan Pahang juga kata mereka berpuas hati dgn tahap keselamatan yang dilaporkan oleh LPTA. Akan tetapi LPTA pula pernah berkata bahawa mereka hanya keluarkan Lesen. MITI yang beri ” Strategic Pioneer Status” dan pengecualian cukai selama 12 tahun.

Compare this with utterings of the MCA Kuantan chief who in dealing with this potentially serious environmental issue of common concern seemed to be unable to forget the usual MCA style of discrediting others who are not of the BN colours (23 April):

Kuantan MCA chairman Datuk Ti Lian Ker when contacted, said the opposition had purposely turned the project into a political issue and used “emotion and anger” to attract the public’s attention.

“Opposition leader in the State Assembly, Leong Ngah Ngah from DAP, when attending the briefings on the project for elected representatives in 2009, had also agreed to the construction of the project, and was reported by a Chinese daily as saying that the state government had managed to secure a huge investment from abroad,” he said.

Ti also said several briefing sessions conducted to explain the issue had also turned into a political battlefields.

“The people in Kuantan were deluged with information that made people emotional and angry. Is this the opposition’s political agenda? They seem to be smarter that the atomic energy experts and the AELB,” he added.

Ti Lian Ker, your biodata proudly declared you were the State Assemblyman for Teruntum (1995-2008), Menteri Besar Pahang’s Special Officer from 2008, and appointed Pengerusi Lembaga Rayuan Perancang Bandar dan Desa Negeri Pahang in 2009. Surely you must have heard early news of Lynas’ proposal to do this business which was approved in January 2008? What happened? Did you inform and discuss potentialities of this business and potential issues with MCA members and the people living there to pre-empt problems? Or, heaven forbid, you have no idea at all what happened during your watch?

For that matter, how about the level of knowledge of Lynas’ business from all the Pahang MPs and ADUNs who are/were in service then and now? If they can say they know nothing because they were not aware or told about it, Pahang voters are going to be laughing stock of the whole world cos their elected representatives who are/were supposed to safeguard their constituents have let them down badly.

Maybe politicians should learn from the Pahang Bar Council :

Pahang Bar chairman Hon Kai Ping admitted the suggestion might tarnish Malaysia’s image as an investment destination but pointed out that the government should not rush its decision with so much at stake. “The Pahang Bar is of the opinion that careful and thorough scrutiny of the rare earth operations is needed here and no decision should be rushed if the government is serious regarding the health and welfare of Malaysians,”

April 21, 2011

Will you ask Najib Razak to quit as PM if MCA fail in GE13?

Am very impressed with concerns raised by commentators reacting to Chua Soi Lek’s call to Taib Mahmud to step down cos the old guy’s SUPP couldn’t deliver the Chinese votes.

So, Najib? Want to slap MCA leaders/ministers (Chua Soi Lek, Liow Tiong Lai, Ng Yen Yen, Chor Chee Heung, Kong Chor Ha) or not for their insolence towards 1Malaysia new politics? Make sure you keep this in mind when you do the shuffle for the cabinet, ok?

Read and be entertained:

“Did MCA did better or worse than SUPP in 2008? Do they know that by implication, they will ask Najib to quit UMNO if MCA is wiped out (and MCA WILL be wiped out) in the next GE? Why are you adopting Mahathir, Perkasa and Pembela culture? Sad betrayal of Chinese hopes and trust.”

“There is only bn and mca who went around telling a particular race that they will not have such race in the government if not elected. This is a scare tactic but does not work cos what we want is those to rep us must be of integrity, caring and those corrupt, racialist and now blame others for their doing.Pui to you mca, mahatir, utusan and perkasa.”

“Be careful! Taib will very soon be asking MCA to extinct yourselves for losing Chinese support.”

“.. the political climate has changed and MCA is losing direction as how to function in this new environment. Telling others to quit when they themselves should dissappear”

“Just sorak kosong. Taib will add on MCA joker list to persona-non-grata to the state immigration department under circus clown without state permit.”

“Call for Taib to quit is ungentlemanly. PBB won 100 % and if PBB had taken a beating, Sarawak would most probably be run by Pakatan.”

“Why must MCA always argue their case based on racial lines? Whilst it’s fitting that they can clamour for the ouster of Taib, we ought to put the record straight that it was not only the Chinese who do not support the CM but the other races as well. It was quite coincidental that the majority of the urbanites are Chinese and this was perceived as the actual scenario.”

And this remark by ‘Confused’ says it all for the confused public:

“I just do not know what the MCA is up to making all sorts of statements. I do not support Taib and think he should resign BUT the fact is Sarawak BN won 55 out of 71 seats(77% of the seats) and PBB won all 35 seats it contested. If Taib should quit because he has lost the support of the Chinese community, should not Najib quit too because he has also lost the support of the Chinese community too and has a lower percentage of seats?”

April 14, 2011

Sarawak and the Chinese connection

Here’s an interesting telling of deep links of Chinese communities in Sarawak influencing the government. If SUPP fail to have a good show in this election to retain whatever seat they still hold in the state assembly, will the Chinese business community of Sarawak say goodbye to their economic pie? Hmmmm…

Sarawak and the Chinese scores

The unique lifestyle and ambience of the localities of Sarawak today is a result from years of goodwill, understanding, cooperation and reciprocity among its indigenous groups with the Chinese.

A visit to the Chinese Museum in Kuching offers an interesting picture of Sarawak’s politics of development over the past 30 years that have risen from the Chinese connection. A tour of this Museum is recommended for all interested to learn and apply the secret of key business successes in order to extend it into the future successes of Sarawak.

The Chinese History Museum, located on the ground of the Kuching Waterfront within a stone throw of the landmark Tua Pek Kong Temple tells an interesting story to visitors to Kuching. According to history, the compact building housing the museum was originally built in 1912 as an administrative centre and the judicial court of the local Chinese, but was taken over by the Chinese Chamber of Commerce of Kuching in 1921 until the present Museum began in 1993.

For first time oversea visitors to Kuching, the museum showcases the multiplicity aspects of the dialectical make-up of Sarawak Chinese, thus providing a clearer perspective into the make-up of the Chinese psyche.

Inside the Chinese Museum, one can immerse in the history of the arrival of Chinese to Sarawak with old pictures and photographs of the bygone eras. All the dialect groups of the Sarawak Chinese are presented here, from the Hakka, Hokkien, Foochow, Cantonese to other minor groups. History buffs would enjoy soaking up the stories and exhibits while regaling in the success stories and vast contributions of the Chinese community leaders to Sarawak.

One can connect to the hardwork and vision of these early businessmen who applied their shrewd business acumen and understood the importance to develop goodwill and friendship by working closely with the local communities to benefit the Sarawakian economy.

Among the earliest indigenous groups to have contact with the outside world is the Melanau people. The community’s long history, legendary tales and myths add colour to the Mukah locality. Melanaus have produced many notable leaders, including Tan Sri Abdul Taib Mahmud, who led Sarawak in modern times as its Chief Minister.

Many have admired and asked how a Melanau, whose community make up only 6% of Sarawak’s population can rise up and more importantly, engineered Sarawak’s development. In this case, the close link between the Chinese with their local indigenous partnership should be celebrated. The Chinese connection and united ethnic groups led by their respective political parties riding on the politics of development concept have brought success to Sarawak in the past 30 years. Its proven historical success is seen as the master key to unlock another interesting phase in Sarawak’s exciting future.

Apart from ongoing infrastructural development like roads and town expansion, Sarawak is embarking on a massive transformation with The Sarawak Corridor of Renewable Energy or simply known as SCORE, a major initiative undertaken to develop the Central Region and transform Sarawak into a developed State by the year 2020. It aims to achieve the goals of accelerating the State’s economic growth and development, as well as improving the quality of life for the people of Sarawak.

From now until 2016, the support and participation from the people of Sarawak are needed to build critical mass and momentum to trigger development, implement high priority infrastructure projects and manage high priority trigger projects. This presents a new shinning opportunity for the political leader possessing the mandatory experience and political savviness to rein in the close business cooperation of the myriad of Sarawak’s communities up to another level internationally.

By the act of harnessing on the Chinese communities and driven by the concept of politics of development, the world may read of another big success story from Sarawak.

By: Bintang Bulan

April 13, 2011

So, how about a score for Sarawak?

I’m trying to vary the contents of me blog. Boring will it be if it solely be bananafied’s voice always (in Yoda language).

So, here’s another article from a friend in Sarawak to dedicate to BC’s dear readers. Any comments, you know what to do lar.

How About A Score For Sarawak?

There is one important question that a proud Sarawakian voter will question their election candidates before they pre-qualify them, especially to the novice politicians before letting them make long range policies on behalf of the people of the state.

We all know about those familiar faced candidates who have been involved in mapping out the Sarawak State Assembly policy for its economic and education future. From the Barisan Nasional’s side, they’re the ones who have been seen participating and contributed input into drawing up of crucial state developmental policies like education which achieved its goal of establishing 3 public universities, 3 private universities, 38 private colleges or university branch campuses. Another important developmental policy for the economic growth is outlined in SCORE (Sarawak Corridor Of Renewable Energy) that we keep reading about in the newspaper ever since BN highlighted it prominently in their manifesto.

Before we proceed, let’s arrive at a common understanding of what is a manifesto. According to Wikipedia, it is a public declaration of policy and aims, especially one issued before an election by a political party or candidate.

For this round of the Sarawak state election, the manifestos from both Barisan Nasional and Pakatan Rakyat are already disseminated to the voting public and hopefully will not escape the scrutinizing of the all voters who may or may not be partial to any contesting party.

Let’s check out BN’s manifesto which actually has a long range plan via Score to change Sarawak to become the richest State in Malaysia. According the elaboration, Score would increase the state’s per capita income to RM97,500 by 2030, compared with RM45,000 in 2020 and RM37,287 last year.

So, what’s in the Score that is relevant to the normal man who needs to make a living from day to day to feed his family? A further check with the manifesto (by the way, this is a good authority to reference now that it is a made as promise by BN) says that Score is capable of generating 836,000 jobs by 2030, including 44,000 at the professional and management levels as well as 82,000 engineering and technical jobs. Ok, increase of job opportunities checked for the future.

Next, which sector of the economy that BN tells me I should guide my children to specialise in their studies so that they can ride on the economic road map?

Vide Score, BN will give special emphasis to oil, aluminium, iron, glass, marine engineering and food processing in the halal hub. Ok, checked – areas of education for children to pursue in their studies, if they do so desire.

Additionally, BN promises to do the following which I don’t think anybody will pick a quarrel with:
• The protection of the environment,
• The preservation of the culture,
• Traditions of all the peoples in the state; generating more employment and business opportunities;
• Providing more education opportunities and guaranteeing the people’s rights over their lands.
• Improve quality of life, basic amenities and infrastructure eg: roads, water supply, electricity, health services and housing would be provided.

Well, so much for BN’s manifesto.

What does Pakatan Rakyat’s 10 point manifesto tell voters?

Basically, to give the state’s wealth to the people. guarantee of freedom of religion, free WiFi to move Sarawak into a knowledge-state, a Competency, Accountability and Transparency system of governance, respecting the 18-points agreement and a promise to investigate allegations of ill-gotten wealth of BN leaders and their cronies.

Kudos for display of nice ideals and admirable aspiration, realistically please give details of your long range plans to your intelligent voters? How about a policy plan to 2020 or beyond to prove Pakatan’s here to stay, Baru Bian? Do consider this important hallmark of a government before attempting to score for the Pakatan ship.

By: Bintang Bulan

April 10, 2011

Let a wise man makes his own decisions, an ignorant man follows public opinion

An excited friend admonished me:

“My dear BC, why are you keeping silent on the Sarawak state election? It is really exciting here in Kuching, the crowds here get to listen to really good talks by opposition every night, DAP speakers are good and entertaining, SUPP not as fiery, but seems like the new chap Dr. Sim Kui Hian is steady and looks like a very reliable politician – if he is elected lar…”

My friend… I’m still in holiday mood and will opt to not side any one party at the moment. So, Sarawakian friends will be missing out on my knify sharp political analysis this week, hehehe.

Anyways, to sooth friends who are buoyed by the highs courtesy of opposition speakers, share with you something I’ve gotten from another savvy friend.

Until next week,

Let a wise man makes his own decisions, an ignorant man follows public opinion

It is a common human fallacy to generalize issues when trying to justify one’s argument in order to KO the opponent. Who haven’t heard of someone who will say “He/she is so typical of a xxx (insert race/category of profession) therefore he/she is (insert assumption of undesirable action here).”

Let’s not be ashamed to admit it, most of us might have done it conscious or unconsciously. Even the DAP and other opposition parties tend to do this ‘natural’ thing. Usually, the members of the opposition will strike first with accusations of xxx (insert preferred presumptions of guilt before trial here). And then it is followed up by bombardments and arguments to stir up the public’s emotion with insinuated wrongdoings such as, “xxx is rich, therefore xxx is corrupted”. This is a well worn method as human beings are found to be intrigued by real or imagined scandals especially if it can blacken the image of the more famous member of the community.

But if one were to dig deeper, one will find that the argument was not wholesome and skewed to be lopsided towards the interest of the opposition. For instance, when debating issues of development, the attacker will not acknowledge truths of how the whole community has also benefited to rise up to better living as compared to their forefather’s hard environment which seriously lacked the economic public infrastructure built up since then. There was no recognition for work and effort put in by the state to satisfy and balance various communities’ demands, sensitivities and interpretations of social justice.

One is reminded how the Chinese who are generally well recognised for their belief in ‘Dao’ and that everything in the universe have a black and white perspective that balances each side for a harmonious life existence. Many Chinese sayings have been handed down since the ancient sage kings to disseminate their wisdom to guide the new generations to balance all sides of each story. Indeed, this has given rise to the general perception that all Chinese are pragmatic practitioners capable of understanding the Dao of both sides of the story before making hasty decisions.

Why not try out the Chinese way to analyze what has been given as ‘truth’ and avoid the risk falling into the trap of ‘One stick knocking down the whole village’. Don’t you think it is a great injustice to deny the work of many good people from the village who has silently contributed to make our lives better today?

by: Bintang Bulan

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